© Roman Milert

© Roman Milert

Whatever the medium I’m working in, I have a vision in mind when I produce a work. It might be something that comes across in an obvious fashion, or my meaning might be subtle.  Either way, there is rarely creation without intent. A five year old might say they want to put all the colors on a page, and a grad students in literary criticism might want to prove that Chaucer was a 23 year old woman trapped in a bear-bating garden in Southwark. Those viewing this art don’t have to agree, but the artist has a reason for their work. It is a rare skill that comes to fruition with no intention. That is not to say that intention carries over to the viewer.

Like that  enemy-making grad student, you might intend to convey something that turns standard interpretations on their heads, or perhaps you just want to mess with people. Either way, if the audience does not see an artist’s vision, it’s likely the artist will be frustrated or down-trodden. Frustrodden.

You see it in documentaries on design in every field. Writers, game developers, painters and architects want the world to see their vision. If after several public interpretations by professional and public critics, the artist’s intention still hasn’t been hit upon, it’s possible that the artist didn’t pull off what he or she had hoped.

Frustrodden or not, try again if you want to change this interpretation, artists. The best way to ensure the artists interpretation is the one heard by the audience? Make your point prominent, not secondary, to the beauty. The world will see what they are able to see in the work. We cannot change that understanding once the work is out there, but we can shed light on our intended meanings and influence the world’s view of our work if we keep producing quality art.